The End Is Near

The End Is Near
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Saturday, July 14, 2012

Good Info!!!

21 Survival Items to Look for at Yard Sales, Thrift Stores and Garage Sales

Jun 19, 2012

yard sale
I have to admit, I’ve always been a sucker for yard sales and garage (or garbage depending on your attitude) sales. I know, it’s tempting to think: “Why should I want to buy any of that stuff, if they don’t even want it?” Well, as the old axiom goes; one man’s trash is another man’s treasure, and you can find some really useful survival items at yard sales, as well as older items that you just can’t find anymore, or aren’t made as sturdy as they used to back in the day. Just because the seller has no use for it (or can’t see a use for it) doesn’t mean it’s useless.
I’ve bought backpacks, camping gear, tools, cast iron pans (if they’re not too rusty) axes, hatchets, knives and lots of other items at yard sales that I still use to this day.
The following is a post from my friend; Lisa Bedford (The Survival Mom) listing 21 survival items to look out for at local yard sales, swap meets, garage sales and thrift stores:
  1. Sterling silver flatware — Even if you can only afford to buy a spoon or a fork at a time, sterling silver is known to have antimicrobial properties. Some people believe that simply using silver flatware as everyday eating utensils can ward off harmful microbes. Typically, a single piece of silver, such as a spoon, will run about $50. Buy from reputable sellers, such as established estate sale agents and thrift stores.
  2. Survival related reference books — Peruse Amazon lists such as this one and become familiar with titles, authors, and subject areas. Books about homesteading, gardening skills, primitive camping, wilderness survival, and so much more are very often found for just a couple of dollars, or less. Other books to look for: Boy Scout manuals, Foxfire books, and issues of Backwoods Home magazines and anthologies.
  3. Grain mill — A good mill can run upwards of $300 and more, but it’s not uncommon to find them in yard sales and thrift stores. Familiarize yourself with good brand names, ask to test the mill with actual wheat (if possible), but otherwise, I’ve found mills in very good condition for less than $50.
  4. Camping equipment — Good quality tents, sleeping bags, camp stoves, lanterns, cots, etc. are often sold at very low prices by people who thought camping was a great idea, tried it once or twice, and decided to stick with hotels! Their loss is your gain!
  5. Good quality knives — Look for brand names such as K-Bar, Cold Steel, and Gerber and know how to spot quality. A Swiss Army Knife is also a good find.
  6. Homeschooling supplies — In a crisis, you may end up being your children’s teacher. Workbooks, classic literature, flash cards, math manipulatives, textbooks, and even school supplies are very often for sale by homeschoolers who are moving up a grade or have decided to liquidate their stockpile of school supplies.
  7. Winter wear — I once picked up a super heavy duty men’s winter coat for ten dollars. I was thrilled because it looks like it’s never been worn and came in a dry cleaner’s bag. Look for snow boots, winter gloves, and other pieces of winter wear, and if you have kids, buy this clothing in a size or two larger for future winters.
  8. Boots — Work boots, riding boots, gardening boots, mucking boots, military boots, motorcycle boots, cowboy boots, hiking boots, desert boots — who knew there were so many different kinds of boots? Check for quality construction and material as well as wear and tear. When it comes to taking care of your feet, always go for quality.
  9. Tools — There’s just something about old tools from the 40′s and 50′s that beats the heck out of today’s “Made in China” label. Some sellers are savvy to the higher quality of their tools and may ask a bit more, but in the long run, it will be worth it.
  10. Battery-operated appliances — I get a lot of questions about survival following an EMP or long-term power outage. If you find battery powered fans, important appliances, and other tools, buy them, just to be ready for a power-down scenario. Be sure to stock up on the appropriate batteries as well.
  11. Food dehydrator — No need to be a snob about this. I still use the inexpensive American Harvest dehydrator I bought a few years ago on Craigslist. I spent $30 and got extra trays, fruit leather trays, and even a couple of screen trays.
  12. Fishing equipment — I’ve seen top-quality fishing poles, nets, enormous collections of flies, rods, reels, you name it. If part of your survival plan is to go fishing for food, estate and yard sales are prime sources for supplies.
  13. Emergency supplies — I’ve picked up emergency radios, lanterns, backpacks, water purification tablets, and paracord. Most of what I have in my Vehicle Emergency Kit was found at these sales. By the way, here’s a tip: often the best survival related supplies will be found out in the garage, if you’re attending an estate sale.
  14. Tough kids clothing — Believe it or not, when my son was quite young, I discovered that Gymboree made the toughest jeans on the market. I don’t believe he ever wore a hole through the knees of his Gymboree jeans. Kids are notoriously tough on clothes, so when you’re looking at second hand clothing, go for brands and fabrics that will stand up to serious wear and tear. Buy them in larger sizes, so you’ll be ready for growth spurts.
  15. Canning jars and supplies — Look for Ball brand jars in all sizes. You can always buy the lids and rims at a grocery store or on Amazon. Also look for things like a magnetic lid lifter, funnel, jar tongs, and large pots. It would be a good idea to know prices of new canning supplies. Once I was at an estate sale, found a nice large water bath canning pot, but when I checked the price on Amazon, the yard sale price was higher!
  16. Manual kitchen and household tools — Do you have a manual egg beater? A flour sifter? Enough manual can openers? A manual meat grinder? I’ve seen all of these and more at estate and yard sales. During a long-term power outage, you’ll be glad to have them!
  17. Cast iron cookware — Guess where I picked up my two best cast iron skillets? Yep, at garage sales!
  18. Cookbooks — Specifically look for cookbooks that provide recipes for outdoor cooking, canning, Dutch oven cooking, and cooking with basic ingredients.
  19. Good quality gardening tools and supplies — Often, in urban and suburban settings, gardening is a fad that comes and goes. You will likely find everything you need for your garden just by shopping yard sales and Goodwill.
  20. First aid and medical supplies — Boxes of surgical gloves, bandages, butterfly strips, surgical scissors, sterile gauze and entire well-equipped first aid kits are sold at bargain prices. Once I even saw an old Army first aid kit with a snake-bite kit and ammonia inhalants, circa 1955! I prefer estate sales, and very often, the owner of the home was taken care of by a visiting nurse service. I’ve found massive amounts of medical supplies in just these types of sales. Don’t worry, I didn’t buy everything! I left some for you!
  21. Hunting supplies and firearms — In some yard/garage sales, you just might get lucky and spot hunting rifles and even handguns for sale. If you see lots of hunting related items, quietly ask the homeowner if he/she also has firearms for sale. There are plenty of other hunting supplies out there, though, including gun cleaning kits and decoys. If you hit the right yard sale, you might feel like you’re in Cabela’s!

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